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Fox News Sees Uptick After Redacted Affidavit Release

All three major cable news outlets experienced an uptick when the affidavit was released with Fox News Channel leading the noon hour.

Doug Pucci

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The news of the Justice Department’s release of the redacted affidavit used to obtain the search warrant for Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate from early August highlighted the news cycle on Friday, August 26. According to the document, the FBI told a judge that there was “probable cause to believe” that classified national security materials were improperly taken to “unauthorized” locations and that there was likely “evidence of obstruction.”

All three major cable news outlets experienced an uptick when the affidavit was released. Fox News Channel led the noon hour with 2.12 million total viewers including 257,000 within the key 25-54 demographic, according to Nielsen Media Research. One hour prior (11 a.m.-noon), FNC drew 1.71 million total/227,000 adults 25-54.

FNC then slipped to a still-potent total audience of 1.8 million in the 1 p.m. hour, and to 1.6 million at 2 p.m. Meanwhile, the other two news networks, CNN and MSNBC, held on to its relative boosts for more than hour, as follows:

CNN

11 a.m.-noon: 0.708 million viewers (135,000 adults 25-54)

noon-1 p.m.: 1.019 million viewers (192,000 adults 25-54)

1 p.m.-2 p.m.: 0.956 million viewers (195,000 adults 25-54)

2 p.m.-3 p.m.: 0.822 million viewers (176,000 adults 25-54)

3 p.m.-4 p.m.: 0.896 million viewers (216,000 adults 25-54)

4 p.m.-5 p.m.: 0.922 million viewers (204,000 adults 25-54)

MSNBC

11 a.m.-noon: 0.913 million viewers (78,000 adults 25-54)

noon-1 p.m.: 1.346 million viewers (137,000 adults 25-54)

1 p.m.-2 p.m.: 1.421 million viewers (159,000 adults 25-54)

2 p.m.-3 p.m.: 1.340 million viewers (129,000 adults 25-54)

Not only did the breaking news boost the networks from the morning hours, they all also rose from the prior Friday (Aug. 19). In the noon to 3 p.m. window, MSNBC grew the most in raw figures as well as in percentage: +81 percent (1.37 million, vs. 0.76 million — +610,000 viewers); Fox News Channel increased by 13 percent (1.84 million, vs. 1.625 million); CNN, from noon to 5 p.m., was up by 33 percent (935,000, vs. 702,000).

With recent concerns about inflation, Fox Business Network (FBN) has been the most-watched business outlet for the past 15 consecutive weeks. For Aug. 22-26, including Aug. 26 when the Dow Jones plunged 1,000 points from fears of a potential interest rate hike by the government, FBN averaged 205,000 business day viewers (Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.), a 13-percent advantage over CNBC (182,000 viewers). FBN’s 4 p.m. program “Kudlow” led business news for the week with 308,000 viewers, while weekday morning program “Varney & Co.” (257,000) was runner-up.

Cable news averages for August 22-28, 2022:

Total Day (Aug. 22-28 @ 6 a.m.-5:59 a.m.)

  • Fox News Channel: 1.440 million viewers; 202,000 adults 25-54
  • MSNBC: 0.820 million viewers; 89,000 adults 25-54
  • CNN: 0.524 million viewers; 103,000 adults 25-54
  • HLN: 0.179 million viewers; 55,000 adults 25-54
  • CNBC: 0.178 million viewers; 46,000 adults 25-54
  • Newsmax: 0.117 million viewers; 15,000 adults 25-54
  • The Weather Channel: 0.105 million viewers; 23,000 adults 25-54
  • Fox Business Network: 0.101 million viewers; 11,000 adults 25-54

Prime Time (Aug. 22-27 @ 8-11 p.m.; Aug. 28 @ 7-11 p.m.)

  • Fox News Channel: 2.206 million viewers; 287,000 adults 25-54
  • MSNBC: 1.310 million viewers; 128,000 adults 25-54
  • CNN: 0.632 million viewers; 132,000 adults 25-54
  • HLN: 0.225 million viewers; 60,000 adults 25-54
  • CNBC: 0.176 million viewers; 63,000 adults 25-54
  • The Weather Channel: 0.153 million viewers; 26,000 adults 25-54
  • Newsmax: 0.147 million viewers; 18,000 adults 25-54
  • Fox Business Network: 0.048 million viewers; 7,000 adults 25-54
  • NewsNation: 0.048 million viewers; 6,000 adults 25-54

Top 10 most-watched cable news programs (and the top programs of other outlets with their respective associated ranks) in total viewers:

1. The Five (FOXNC, Mon. 8/22/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 3.428 million viewers

2. The Five (FOXNC, Wed. 8/24/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 3.398 million viewers

3. Tucker Carlson Tonight (FOXNC, Mon. 8/22/2022 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 3.373 million viewers

4. Tucker Carlson Tonight (FOXNC, Thu. 8/25/2022 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 3.277 million viewers

5. The Five (FOXNC, Thu. 8/25/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 3.263 million viewers

6. Tucker Carlson Tonight (FOXNC, Tue. 8/23/2022 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 3.260 million viewers

7. The Five (FOXNC, Tue. 8/23/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 3.230 million viewers

8. Tucker Carlson Tonight (FOXNC, Wed. 8/24/2022 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 3.148 million viewers

9. The Five (FOXNC, Fri. 8/26/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 3.055 million viewers

10. Jesse Watters Primetime (FOXNC, Tue. 8/23/2022 7:00 PM, 60 min.) 2.943 million viewers

18. Rachel Maddow Show (MSNBC, Mon. 8/22/2022 9:00 PM, 60 min.) 2.473 million viewers

149. Inside Politics (CNN, Fri. 8/26/2022 12:00 PM, 60 min.) 1.019 million viewers

203. Real Time With Bill Maher “Episode 610” (HBO, Fri. 8/26/2022 10:00 PM, 55 min.) 0.755 million viewers

390. Forensic Files “As The Tide Turns” (HLN, Mon. 8/22/2022 11:30 PM, 30 min.) 0.386 million viewers

420. Kudlow (FBN, Wed. 8/24/2022 4:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.324 million viewers

463. Shark Tank “Shark Tank 908” (CNBC, Thu. 8/25/2022 9:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.276 million viewers

556. Highway Thru Hell “(1012) Heavy Liftoff” (TWC, Wed. 8/24/2022 9:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.227 million viewers

793. Newsnation: Rush Hour (NWSN, Mon. 8/22/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.127 million viewers

Top 10 cable news programs (and the top  programs of other outlets with their respective associated ranks) among adults 25-54

1. Tucker Carlson Tonight (FOXNC, Mon. 8/22/2022 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.478 million adults 25-54

2. Tucker Carlson Tonight (FOXNC, Tue. 8/23/2022 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.464 million adults 25-54

3. Tucker Carlson Tonight (FOXNC, Thu. 8/25/2022 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.458 million adults 25-54

4. Tucker Carlson Tonight (FOXNC, Wed. 8/24/2022 8:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.447 million adults 25-54

5. The Five (FOXNC, Mon. 8/22/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.419 million adults 25-54

6. The Five (FOXNC, Tue. 8/23/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.402 million adults 25-54

7. The Five (FOXNC, Wed. 8/24/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.396 million adults 25-54

8. Hannity (FOXNC, Mon. 8/22/2022 9:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.392 million adults 25-54

9. Jesse Watters Primetime (FOXNC, Wed. 8/24/2022 7:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.392 million adults 25-54

10. The Five (FOXNC, Fri. 8/26/2022 5:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.390 million adults 25-54

50. Rachel Maddow Show (MSNBC, Mon. 8/22/2022 9:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.233 million adults 25-54

65. CNN Newsroom (CNN, Fri. 8/26/2022 3:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.216 million adults 25-54

175. Forensic Files “If I Were You” (HLN, Mon. 8/22/2022 11:00 PM, 30 min.) 0.136 million adults 25-54

191. Real Time With Bill Maher “Episode 610” (HBO, Fri. 8/26/2022 10:00 PM, 55 min.) 0.130 million adults 25-54

234. Shark Tank “Shark Tank 908” (CNBC, Thu. 8/25/2022 9:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.117 million adults 25-54

532. Why Planes Crash “Who’s Flying” (TWC, Sat. 8/27/2022 12:00 AM, 60 min.) 0.060 million adults 25-54

665. Mornings with Maria Bartiromo (FBN, Fri. 8/26/2022 8:00 AM, 60 min.) 0.038 million adults 25-54

704. Newsnation Prime (NWSN, Sun. 8/28/2022 7:00 PM, 60 min.) 0.034 million adults 25-54

Source: Live+Same Day data, Nielsen Media Research

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Can News/Talk Radio Find Ways to Keep Revenue Up While Shortening Spot Blocks?

I may be naïve, but if you could cut out a chunk of commercials, and I get my talk time back, everyone’s a winner.

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Photo of Radio Board

Things are going pretty well with me. You? Actually, I’m not particularly interested in how you’re doing but thought I’d be polite. You see, I’m feeling my proverbial oats a little bit. A lot of things we’ve been trying to map out with our radio show over the last year are starting to come off the map and move into reality.

We’ve been doing more remotes, throwing a dart at a map, and going to that town to do a whole show. Plus, we finally found a TV partner that seems to “get it” and not only work with us but also let us do things our way.

It’s been fun, validating, and informative.

That information, by the way, is not all good.

From all the interactions over the last month or so, I’ve received a lot of direct feedback. Much of it is the usual: Love the show, hate the show, why did you have GUY A on but not GUY B etc…

I like hearing the good and the bad, truly, but one thing was mentioned to me several times, and it has alarm bells ringing in my head.

“Too many commercials”.

“I was in the car for 10 minutes and heard you for 30 seconds”.

“Too many ads; I changed the channel”.

“I like you guys, but if I hear one more erectile dysfunction ad, I might go hard right off a bridge”.

Don’t worry, he meant it as a metaphor. I think.

After the third or fourth similar mention, I started paying more attention to talk time and the ads.

Conclusion: There is no doubt talk time is tighter than it was even three years ago.

A lot of ads in your radio show can mean a lot of things. It can mean the show is doing well, and a lot of people want to advertise with you. It can also mean that ad rates are lower, and they need to sell more ads to make the same amount of money.

The latter is troubling.

I thought about this quite a bit, and when I went to that sales meeting I talked about last week, I came in with an idea. It’s not a new one, and I think a lot of markets may do this for some segments; but for some reason, we don’t.

And we need to.

Find whole-hour sponsors. Make a bunch of mentions, even a minute read here or there. Whatever they need.

Heck, I could even settle for 30-minute sponsorships, but one full hour would be ideal.

I may be naïve, but if you could cut out a chunk of radio commercials, and I get my talk time back, everyone’s a winner.

I’d be so into the sponsor that my pleas for you to patronize the business would be passionate, authentic, and convincing. I promise!

“I LOVE RotoRooter – not just because they sponsor this hour but also because they unclogged my drain in 20 minutes!”

The ED stuff would be rough, but you know what? If it allows the radio show to breathe and thrive — flow, if you will — even that might be worth it.

If you do this in your market, I want to know about it. If you don’t do it and also are worried about diminished talk time, stay tuned!

The truth is that it’s not about ego. If people tune into your show because they like it – or like you and your team — I promise you they don’t like it enough to sit through four minutes of spots for 30 seconds of you, right into 4 minutes of spots, right into news, weather, and traffic.

That’s just brutal, especially if you are only in the car for 20 minutes or so. It would just feel like wasted time, and I am afraid some people already feel that way.

It might make your radio job easier, but it also makes it way less secure.

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Salacious Coverage of Donald Trump Trial Damaging Credibility of Already Suffering News Media

No matter how you split it, Trump and the media have a tumultuous relationship that is negatively impacting and dividing the American public.

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A photo of Donald Trump
(Photo: Gage Skidmore)

As Newsmax legal analysts claim President Donald Trump committed no crime, MSNBC analysts are looking to throw the book at him.

The media circus has certainly hit the Big Apple and each outlet has brought along their Waldorf and Statler to play word semantics and overanalyze the court case. There are several issues with the media coverage of this case, but we will focus on three.

The first problem with this coverage is also a necessary evil: pool reporters. It is physically impossible to allow every outlet into the courtroom. Who is in the room is key to neutral reporting.

For those outside of NY, pool reporters are typically selected on a rotating basis (not sure if this is the case in other markets because I’ve only ever worked in the #1). This allows every outlet (and even questionable ones) to observe the defendant in court. When the email came across the pool notes chain saying, “Trump is asleep in court,” I immediately questioned it, because of who it came from. Fortunately, I was not the only one.

Another astute reporter (not me) replied to the massive group chain asking for a second reporter to verify this claim. Only the original person responded back saying yes. Rarely do people publicly question the pool reporters and ask for a second person to verify a pool reporter’s claim. Journalism rule number one, you need three sources to verify information. If we can not trust our pool reporters, every outlet’s reporting suffers.

Second? Ramifications of the trial. Outlets on the left are trying to let viewers believe POTUS 45 could spend four years on Rikers Island. The facility, which is home to nearly all of New York City’s criminals, is notorious for gang breeding and corruption. Let’s be very clear: the Secret Service would never let anyone under their protection be held in such a place. If found guilty Trump will likely face a fine and maybe be placed under house arrest.

Additionally, the jail facility does not hold prisoners who are sentenced for more than a year. The idea he will be placed in jail is just an ultra-left fantasy.

If convicted, the following is true: Trump will not be eligible to vote for himself this election cycle, his campaign for the Oval Office can continue, and he could join a list of other elected politicians who have been convicted or pleaded guilty of a federal crime. On the national level, in 1789, Rep. Matthew Lyon (D/R-VT) was re-elected to office while serving a four-month jail sentence.

In more recent history, former Sen. Ted Kennedy (D-MA) pleaded guilty while in office for the death of Mary Jo Kopechne for the “Chappaquiddick incident,” he was re-elected several times after the alleged accident.

On the local level, current Bridgeport, CT Mayor Joe Ganim is serving a second stint in office after serving time in federal prison. Mayor Duane Gurule, of Rocky Ford, Colorado, is also serving as the town’s Mayor after being convicted of a federal crime. Other recent former mayors who are convicted felons include, Marion Barry (DC) and Jermaine Wilson (Leavenworth, Kansas). 

Additionally, Roy Hebron was elected mayor of Rapides Parish, Louisiana but could not be sworn in because of the state’s constitutional amendment which prevented felons from holding office for five years after they ended their prison sentence. The examples above are a list of Democrats and Republicans. Despite what outlets tell you, people will and have voted for a convicted felon.

While the former President has not been convicted of any felonies, he was convicted for sexually abusing and defaming E. Jean Carroll (no relation). However, members of the media have wrongly said he was convicted of rape, prompting a defamation lawsuit between President Trump, ABC, and George Stephanopoulos. Some speculate this case will have a similar ending to Trump’s defamation suit against CNN.

This opens up my final point: President Trump’s contentious relationship with the media, before, during, and after his presidency. For years before his Presidency, Donald Trump had several run-ins with the media. This caused many outlets to already have a negative or tabloid-esque attitude toward the real estate mogul pre-presidency.

The national media followed suit pandering to their readers’ views instead of reporting fairly on the then-presidential candidate. Take a look at these headlines from his campaign announcement:

  • 
The Guardian: Donald Trump’s tirade on Mexico’s ‘drugs and rapists’ outrages US Latinos
  • New York Daily News: Donald Trump enters 2016 presidential race with bizarre speech insulting Mexican immigrants, lambasting Obama
  • LA Times: Donald Trump enters race, and GOP wonders: Presidency or reality TV?

None of these headlines were flattering. Some didn’t even take him seriously. While the mainstream gave good bland headlines of “Donald Trump enters 2016 presidential race,” the articles themselves were laced with bias. CBS claiming the former president’s speech was “also frequently wrong.” CNN’s article dismissed Trump saying, “Many Americans now view him primarily as a reality-TV star.”

Nevertheless, he dominated the headlines in 2016, won, with outlets quickly realizing he makes people click, giving them revenue many had not seen before.

Since leaving office, POTUS 45 still regally made the headlines. It’s not just because of the many court cases. It’s because he creates really good clickbait, and in turn, revenue, for outlets. 
New York Times: Could Trump Go to Prison? If He Does, the Secret Service Goes, Too

No matter how you split it, Trump and the media have a tumultuous relationship that is negatively impacting and dividing the American public.

Over the last four years, former President Donald Trump has still made consistent headlines more than any other former president. Even Grover Cleveland, who was reelected four years after he left office, made less headlines than Trump while out of office. The media’s obsession on both the left and right has proven to be a great distraction from our current President’s cognitive decline.

Perhaps if the suits (aka C-suite executives) cared more about content and less about ad sales, honest journalists (because there are a few out there) would have to bother less with directives and more on honest journalism.

Let me be clear, yes, this is a historic court case that needs to be covered. However, not with this extent of bias from the left and right sides of the media. We are the fourth estate. We should be serving the American public without corporate or personal bias.

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Fox News Leads Coverage of Iran/Israel Bombing

Fox News led all cable outlets in extensive breaking news coverage, peaking at the 8-9 p.m. ET hour with 2.488 million viewers.

Doug Pucci

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A photo of a Fox News mic flag
(Photo: NurPhoto for Getty Images)

Iran launched more than 200 explosive drones and fired missiles at Israel late on Saturday, Apr. 13, which left both network and cable news outlets like Fox News, MSNBC, and CNN scrambling to cover the event. The event was made in retaliation for what Iran called an Israeli strike from Apr. 1 on its consulate in Damascus, the capital of Syria, which killed seven officers of the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, including two senior commanders. 

With the effect of installed defense measures, Iran’s Apr. 13 salvo merely caused light damage to one Israeli military facility. All this with the ongoing Israeli-Hamas war as the backdrop.

Breaking news of Iran’s attack on Israel arrived in the U.S. at 4 p.m. Eastern on Apr. 13.

CBS briefly interrupted third-round coverage of The Masters golf tournament for the special report. Although their initial news brief was not separately tabulated by Nielsen, the network averaged 6.595 million total viewers including 1.892 million within the 25-54 demographic from 3 p.m. to 7:17 p.m. Eastern, marking CBS as the most-watched outlet in announcing this news. Their report following Masters Day 3’s conclusion, at 7:54-8:01 p.m., drew 2.498 million viewers and 499,000 adults 25-54.

The Saturday edition of NBC Nightly News (4.168 million viewers; 415,000 adults 25-54) did better in total viewers over ABC’s World News Tonight (3.684 million viewers; 451,000 adults 25-54) but ABC’s newscast outperformed NBC’s in the key 25-54 demographic. ABC’s extra half-hour special report at 7:30 p.m. Eastern delivered 2.245 million viewers and 331,000 adults 25-54.

On the following morning (Sunday Apr. 14), the first half-hour of CBS’ Face the Nation (2.554 million viewers; 437,000 adults 25-54) was the morning’s top public affairs program, followed by ABC’s This Week (2.258 million viewers; 370,000 adults 25-54). NBC’s Meet the Press (10 AM to 10:49 AM: 2.173 million viewers; 376,000 adults 25-54) and Fox News Sunday (0.984 million viewers; 219,000 adults 25-54).

The second half-hour of Face the Nation, which is lesser distributed to CBS affiliates, drew 2.007 million viewers and 340,000 adults 25-54.

Back to Apr. 13, Fox News led all cable outlets in extensive breaking news coverage, peaking at the 8-9 p.m. ET hour with 2.488 million viewers including 302,000 adults 25-54.

CNN, which also peaked in audience figures within the 8-9 p.m. ET hour (as the hourly breakdowns below indicate), was relatively even with Fox News in the 25-54 demo, averaging 219,000 within the demo from 4-11 p.m. ET (FNC: 221,000).

CNN (981,000) also managed to best MSNBC (723,000) among total viewers.

As for the news netlets, Newsmax’s 6.5 hours of coverage (373,000 viewers; 28,000 adults 25-54) easily outdelivered NewsNation’s four hours (119,000 viewers; 16,000 adults 25-54).

The following are the hourly breakdowns of each cable network on Apr. 13 from 4-11 p.m. ET:

4:00 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

  • Fox News: 1.035 million viewers; 101,000 adults 25-54
  • CNN: 624,000 viewers; 105,000 adults 25-54
  • MSNBC: 583,000 viewers; 66,000 adults 25-54
  • Newsmax (4:30-11 p.m.): 373,000 viewers; 28,000 adults 25-54

5:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.

  • Fox News: 1.514 million viewers; 165,000 adults 25-54
  • CNN: 878,000 viewers; 184,000 adults 25-54
  • MSNBC: 809,000 viewers; 86,000 adults 25-54
  • Newsmax (4:30-11 p.m.): 373,000 viewers; 28,000 adults 25-54

6:00 p.m.-7:00 p.m.

  • Fox News: 1.702 million viewers; 229,000 adults 25-54
  • CNN: 985,000 viewers; 235,000 adults 25-54
  • MSNBC: 810,000 viewers; 116,000 adults 25-54
  • Newsmax (4:30-11 p.m.): 373,000 viewers; 28,000 adults 25-54

7:00 p.m.-8:00 p.m.

  • Fox News: 2.142 million viewers; 278,000 adults 25-54
  • CNN: 1.198 million viewers; 262,000 adults 25-54
  • MSNBC (7-9 p.m.): 846,000 viewers; 118,000 adults 25-54
  • Newsmax (4:30-11 p.m.): 373,000 viewers; 28,000 adults 25-54
  • NewsNation: 161,000 viewers; 26,000 adults 25-54

8:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.

  • Fox News: 2.488 million viewers; 302,000 adults 25-54
  • CNN: 1.254 million viewers; 264,000 adults 25-54
  • MSNBC (7-9 p.m.): 846,000 viewers; 118,000 adults 25-54
  • Newsmax (4:30-11 p.m.): 373,000 viewers; 28,000 adults 25-54
  • NewsNation: 116,000 viewers; 15,000 adults 25-54

9:00 p.m.-10:00 p.m.

  • Fox News: 2.023 million viewers; 250,000 adults 25-54
  • CNN: 1.083 million viewers; 266,000 adults 25-54
  • MSNBC: 627,000 viewers; 59,000 adults 25-54
  • Newsmax (4:30-11 p.m.): 373,000 viewers; 28,000 adults 25-54
  • NewsNation: 113,000 viewers; 11,000 adults 25-54

10:00 p.m.-11:00 p.m.

  • Fox News: 1.802 million viewers; 279,000 adults 25-54
  • CNN: 847,000 viewers; 215,000 adults 25-54
  • MSNBC: 545,000 viewers; 62,000 adults 25-54
  • Newsmax (4:30-11 p.m.): 373,000 viewers; 28,000 adults 25-54
  • NewsNation: 85,000 viewers; 10,000 adults 25-54

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