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Generation Z Needs a Break From the News

Some of Generation Z sense they need a break from the news, and some of the youngest and most savvy media consumers plan to check out temporarily.

Rick Schultz

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Perhaps we can all learn a lesson from self-aware Zoomers. 

Not a lesson on proper emoji use, dating apps, or the current hip language of the day.

Instead, some of Generation Z sense they need a break from the news. In fact, they know they need a break. In an age of constant stimuli, negativity, advertisements, and sensationalism, some of the youngest and most savvy media consumers are planning to check out temporarily.

With news networks barraging our senses daily with click-bait material, it’s no surprise that many of us eventually feel we need to step away. Unfortunately, negative news sells, and we are all highly willing buyers.

This politician was caught in a scandal, while another decided to ruin the country, if not the planet. 

How could citizens possibly vote for him? How could our neighbors maybe trust her?

Gas prices have skyrocketed! Groceries are through the roof! The earth is freezing or melting!

All this and more, with the dawning reality that the political season is just heating up for the fall.

With all this “good” news enveloping our culture and refusing to let us breathe, who’s to blame anyone for needing a break?

On her Thursday Gettr livestream, Gen Z thought leader Isabel Brown began by urging her generation to take a mental health break and turn off the noise, at least temporarily.

“I just want to say, I’ve kind of hit a wall the last couple of weeks, and I don’t know if everybody else is feeling this way,” Brown began. “I saw Allie Beth Stuckey post something about this earlier in the week, and I think I brought it up in my stream on Tuesday. I think there’s just this overwhelming feeling of, for lack of a better term, impending doom.”

It’s possible, even probable, that many Americans share similar sentiments with Brown,  with record-high inflation and a plethora of news items to buoy one’s political persuasion.  

“Overwhelming negativity, everything is awful,” Brown continued, sharing a mood that she has seen infiltrating her circle of influence over recent weeks. “There’s a trending Tik Tok sound from the news that’s like, And in tonight’s breaking news, everything is awful. And I think it literally does feel like that because it just kind of feels like we are in this limbo situation of things not moving forward, of not going our way, of constantly being drug back into this crazy culture war that we’re consistently fighting. And it just feels really overwhelming.”

A contributor to Turning Point USA, the energetic Brown has garnered a loyal and growing following for being a refreshing, counter-culture voice for freedom, morality, and traditional American values. And during the episode, she was taking the pulse of her audience.

“I don’t know if you guys are feeling that way. I’m certainly feeling that way. The post I mentioned from Allie Beth earlier this week was on her story,” Brown said, referring to Stuckey, a fellow rising media star. “She said, tap yes or no if you’re just feeling really overwhelmed and over politics and the news and all of it. And 99 percent of the people in this poll said yes. And I’ve really been feeling that way lately, too.”

And in Brown’s opinion, the timing for a temporary hiatus couldn’t be better.

“I don’t know if you guys just need a break or you need some time away from all of the constant noise and information and negativity being thrown at you from every single direction. I certainly feel like that, working in this world of politics all the time. But I just really want to encourage you this weekend, when you’re gathering with your friends and your family, and you have some downtime on Monday. Maybe you have tomorrow remote or tomorrow off because a lot of companies are doing that this year for Labor Day,” she said. “Take the time – this is a big challenge, but it’s a good one. Take the time to literally turn your phone off. Turn it off. Not silent. Not vibrate. Turn it off, leave it at home, and go do something outside. Go for a hike. Go for a walk. Spend some time with your family. Go fishing. I’m hoping to go fly fishing this weekend. But I’m realizing when I get really overwhelmed, and I am struggling with the overwhelming amount of negativity and just horrifying information going on in the world, I always feel so much better when I take the time to step away from screens. You guys need it too.”

Isabel Brown seemingly has more energy than most, with which she engages viewers and continues building a network of like-minded young Americans. And even she plans to take a short break, putting the news aside and connecting with other essential areas of her life. 

She urges her friends, family, and followers to do the same.

“Read a book. Go for a hike. Go outside this weekend. Please, that is my challenge for you because I think we will all be a lot better for it.”

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Proof That Both CNN and Fox News Manipulate Their Audiences

Playing with numbers and technicalities is a function of what the media does today. Since the average person just reads the headline, viewers will likely move on if it confirms their own bias.

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When news organizations collide, journalism loses. Last week, CNN posted on X saying “US inflation cooled down in January, offering some relief for Americans who have suffered through the steepest price hikes in four decades.” The same day Fox News posted “BREAKING: Inflation rises faster than expected in January as high prices persist.”

While these are seemingly opposite statements, both can be true at the same time. More importantly, both of these outlets are manipulating their audience.

People like their own opinions and want those opinions verified by others. This is what social media has done to news: You read the post, see your opinion is valid, and then move on to the next clickbait (confirmation bias). More importantly, both of these tweets are true because one is based on an estimate, and one is based on actual numbers.

Looking at CNN, while their post on X seems positive, their business headline is a little less positive, “Inflation cooled last month, but some price hikes continue to cause pain.” The change from tweet to headline is striking. One says Americans are getting inflation relief, the other says inflation continuing to cause pain. In today’s world of “Read the headline and move on,” this is why people feel CNN lies. Its post is in conflict with the headline— even though both are true statements.

It’s not until you read the article that people can see how this is possible. The outlet notes overall inflation did cool when comparing January 2023 (6.4%) to January 2024 (3.1%). Four sentences into the article it says, “CPI rose by 0.3% in January.” It goes on to break down why inflation is still high and causing pain in the pockets of Americans. Although the X post is factually correct, people on the right side of the political spectrum feel CNN is untrue because they see the inflation problem in their bank account.

Meanwhile, the Fox News X post and Fox Business headline are identical, “Inflation rises faster than expected in January as high prices persist.” However, the keyword here is “expected.” Inflation did cool year-over-year. However, because Fox is comparing the January 2024 number to what experts expected the number to be, what they have posted is factually correct. This nuance is sometimes lost on readers.

The article does not mention inflation is down year-over-year. However, nine sentences into the article, the business outlet says, “Inflation has fallen considerably from a peak of 9.1%.” The nuance of “expected” combined with the lack of mentioning year-over-year inflation is down is why the left side of the political spectrum believes Fox lies.

Let’s be clear, neither CNN nor Fox News have lied (on this one specific topic). They both chose to present the same data differently. It also needs to be noted, CNN and Fox News are not the only outlets that do this. They all do. Playing with numbers and technicalities is a function of what the media does today. Since the average person just reads the headline, viewers will likely move on if it confirms their own bias. The problem is twofold.

  • Facts are no longer direct but skewed to fit a narrative.
  • Some viewers accept headlines and posts without diving deeper into the article.

We have been trained to share a headline without reading the article. We’ve known this since 2016 when Columbia University and the French National Institute found 59% of shared social media links were never read. We’ve gone from headlines selling newspapers, forcing people to read the articles, to headlines being shared on social media, but people won’t read the articles.

This is only a small part of why The Messenger failed: neutrality. The sentiment of unbiased news was well-intentioned. However, America has lacked unbiased news since 1987 when the Fairness Doctrine was abolished. Many on the left believe this has helped right-leaning outlets. This is false. Not only has it benefited both sides of the aisle, it can be argued the progressives have benefited more than the conservatives (but that is a different article for a different day).

When news outlets collide, the American public loses. Not because we lack news, but because we lack the ability to read the full scope of the issues in one place. Outlets are not forced to present all sides of the political argument or present the entirety of data sets. Additionally, news is not being fully read. Headlines are now king. Shares, clicks, and likes keep the lights on in newsrooms. Most importantly, facts are now nuanced. This forces debate instead of continuity and cohesion.

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BNM Writers

Does Dealing With Criticism Ever Get Easier?

Engage in the content of the criticism and ignore the rest – or at least take the high road. If that gets difficult, end the conversation.

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A photo of the word Truth written on a typewriter

Thick skin. If you work in media, you gotta have it. If you don’t, you either won’t last or you won’t sleep – or both.

Even if you are neutral politically, super nice, and in it for all the right reasons, there always will be people who criticize you, and some will even make it personal.

Having “thick skin” is a cliché I’ve been thinking about and dealing with for years. I find it fascinating that, somehow, I am way more sensitive at home than I am at work – and by at work, I mean on the air for hours every day.

Even the angriest of listeners are engaging, and engagement is what I want. Sometimes, it can throw a show off-balance, but if handled properly, it should never fully derail you.

Over the years, I have modified my professional behavior, perspective, and attitude, yet my foundational approach has not changed. It began with my first full-time television job when a journalist/mentor of mine told me not to ever act interested in ratings. Rather, he said, focus on my performance and content — the rest would take care of itself.

In my first two anchor/host jobs, it worked wonderfully. I immersed myself in the job, and the ratings were strong. I thought it was a mandate to always take this approach, although in retrospect, I was probably more lucky than good. Regardless, following that mantra actually allowed me to learn my craft and not be overly aware that ratings mattered.

Ignorance was journalistic bliss.

Flash forward to 2024 and it all seems rather naïve, but I think the approach really works well with criticism, too, whether it be on social media, through phone calls or even with fellow hosts.

Just a quick note on nuance: Look at the sentence four paragraphs above – don’t act interested. Looking back at the guidance given by my mentor, his point also seemed to be that even if you are laser-focused on how a show is rating, don’t make it a major topic of conversation, and don’t let people think it defines you as a broadcaster and journalist.

All of it may seem like advice from Fantasyland, but in an indirect way, this approach also makes me less vulnerable to criticism. I simply don’t focus on it too much, and over time, it stopped bothering me even if I did focus on it. Make sense?

Of course, it’s not as if I like it when a listener rips me or the show, either directly or on social media; but I never engage emotionally, and if I do respond in any way, it’s usually content-focused.

That’s the key.

Engage in the content of the criticism and ignore the rest – or at least take the high road. If that gets difficult, end the conversation.

You have the conch. Never forget that.

Ultimately, you’ll feel better, especially knowing you did not take the bait and handled it professionally – no need to create any more tension than is already out in the media eether.

That brings me to the moment a host of a show on my station was sharply critical of an interview I had done, saying it was soft, and not holding the guest (a sitting U.S. Senator) accountable enough.

Specific questions were put forth that absolutely should have been asked, according to the host, and honestly, it was used as a chest puffer for that person to show why certain guests were scared to come on that later show.

And … I thought it was great.

Great?

Well, maybe not great, but I actually had no problem with it. First and foremost, they were talking about it, which is good. When I can provide that kind of grist, it’s good radio. It wasn’t always easy to listen to — I was still in the office doing some booking — but for some reason, it did not bother me. This from a guy who gets a one-second side eye from my wife of 20 years, and I think our marriage is in trouble.

In the end, a few of the criticisms were helpful, believe it or not: One or two of the suggested questions put forth on the later show should have been asked.

It’s all part of the balance I seek to create a place where members of both political parties feel comfortable coming on our network. I always reserve the right to ask difficult questions, and I do ask them (apparently not enough for some), but I also try and be balanced and manage relationships.

It’s delicate, and sometimes, elicits criticism – sometimes deserved. Meanwhile, I just focus on the content, naïve as that may be.

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CBS Mornings Scores Big Post-Super Ratings Win

CBS Mornings became the most-watched program from 7-9 a.m. in total viewers for just the second time ever for a CBS morning news show.

Doug Pucci

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A photo of the CBS Mornings logo

The historic ratings milestones continue for CBS as a result of Super Bowl LVIII.

Less than nine hours following what turned out to be the most-watched telecast in U.S. TV history to date (120.25 million of the near-124 million watching Super Bowl LVIII did so on CBS), CBS Mornings became the most-watched program from 7-9 a.m. in total viewers for just the second time ever for a CBS morning news show.

For the Monday, Feb. 12 edition of CBS Mornings, which featured co-host Nate Burleson from Las Vegas, the site of Super Bowl LVIII, and a visit from Jon Stewart in New York to promote his Daily Show return (which generated great ratings milestones of its own later that night), it delivered 2.9 million total viewers including 654,000 within the key 25-54 demographic, according to Nielsen Media Research. It marked its best total audience and demo figures since Feb. 4, 2022.

CBS Mornings topped ABC’s Good Morning America, the usual morning news viewer leader, by a mere 7,000 viewers; it also outdrew NBC’s Today (2.86 million) by 49,000 viewers.

CBS also bested ABC in A25-54 by +103,000; the sixth time CBS Mornings has led over Good Morning America this season based on the key demo.

This was not the first time a morning show benefited from a halo effect of what the network had aired the night prior. Mar. 8, 2021, was the first time CBS won in the morning. It was the day after Oprah Winfrey’s primetime interview with Meghan Markle and Prince Harry had aired which drew 17.1 million viewers for CBS. The Mar. 8, 2021 edition of CBS This Morning featured an exclusive interview with Winfrey and the premiere of never-before-seen clips from the Meghan and Prince Harry discussion, had delivered 4.793 million viewers with 1.026 million of them in the 25-54 demographic.

The program changed its title to CBS Mornings in September 2021.

For this 2023-24 season, CBS Mornings has the smallest deficit margin in viewers with ABC’s Good Morning America since the 2017-18 season and the tightest margin in A25-54 ever.

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