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After Facebook Threat, Journalism Bill Left Out Of Year-End Legislation

“These threats were attempted before the Australian government passed a similar law to compensate news outlets, played out unsuccessfully, and ultimately news publishers were paid.”

Barrett News Media

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The Journalism Competition and Preservation Act — the bill vehemently opposed by Facebook — has been left out of a spending bill that leaves it unlikely to be passed before the end of the year.

The bill would protect media companies to jointly negotiate with tech companies for content distribution and be free from antitrust violations in the process.

Earlier this week, Facebook threatened to remove news from its platform should the bill pass.

“If Congress passes an ill-considered journalism bill as part of national security legislation, we will be forced to consider removing news from our platform altogether rather than submit to government-mandated negotiations that unfairly disregard any value we provide to news outlets through increased traffic and subscriptions,” a statement from the social media platform read.

The News Media Alliance, according to a statement given to Deadline, called Facebook’s threat “undemocratic”.

“As the tech platforms compensate news publishers around the world, it demonstrates there is a demand and economic value for news,” the group said. “These threats were attempted before the Australian government passed a similar law to compensate news outlets, played out unsuccessfully, and ultimately news publishers were paid.”

The bill was designed to help prevent the decline of local news outlets, both print and broadcast. A bipartisan coalition including Senators Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), John Kennedy (R-LA), Dick Durbin (D-IL), and Representatives Jerry Nadler (D-NY), Ken Buck (R-CO), and David Cicilline (D-RI) sponsored the latest iteration of the bill.

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Media Business

Nick Clegg: Donald Trump Must Play By Rules After Meta Reinstates Accounts

Nick Clegg, Meta President for Global Affairs, told Bret Baier Wednesday that there will be guardrails in place if Donald Trump returns to the platforms again.

Ryan Hedrick

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Meta, the parent company of Facebook and Instagram, announced that it was ending its two-year suspension of accounts held by former President Donald Trump. According to The Hill, the suspension will be lifted in the coming weeks. 

Nick Clegg, Meta President for Global Affairs, told Fox News’ “Special Report” with Bret Baier Wednesday that there will be guardrails in place if Trump decides to use those platforms again. 

“He’s gotta play by the rules,” said Clegg. “We are announcing some additional ones today to encourage him to stick to the rules that exist when people use Facebook and Instagram.” 

Trump was suspended in the wake of the Jan 6th riots at the U.S. Capitol. The mainstream media and Big Tech alleged the events of that fateful day amounted to an insurrection. His Twitter account was reinstated in November when Elon Musk completed the purchase of the company.

“At the end of the day we believe that the American people should hear from and including on our apps and services, from those who want to lead them. Trump is the former president of this country and vying to be the next president in 2024. We don’t want to stand in the way.” 

Clegg said it’s up to Trump whether he wants to use Facebook and Instagram. Last October, Trump launched Truth Social in response to his ban from Big Tech. According to Reuters, Trump has 34 million followers on Facebook and 23 million on Instagram. 

“We are not a political entity,” Clegg added. “We don’t try to make decisions which kind of help one side or the other. We believe in free and open debate. We are trying to strike the right balance between free expression, free and open political debate, while also at the same time making sure for all the users that use Facebook and Instagram. It’s an enjoyable experience.” 

If Trump agrees to return to the platforms but violates community standards, the social media outlet will remove his content, and he will be suspended for between one month and two years. 

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Media Business

Peter Tanz Elevated to Midwest Communications President

“He is well-respected throughout our company and is the best choice to lead Midwest to future success the way Duke wanted.”

Barrett News Media

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Longtime Midwest Communications Market Manager Peter Tanz has been elevated to the role of the company’s President.

Tanz succeeds Duke Wright — the company’s founder — after his death in December. Wright bought his first radio station in 1958 before officially launching Midwest Communications in 1971.

Tanz joined Midwest Communications in 1985 in the sales department of WIXX in Green Bay. He was later promoted to General Manager of the company’s stations in Wausau, Wisconsin. He then led stations throughout the company in several states before returning to Green Bay as the cluster’s Senior Vice President and Market Manager in 2016.

“Peter has worked with and learned the business of broadcasting from Duke for over 35 years,” said Pegge Wright, Midwest Communications chairwoman and widow of Duke Wright. “He is well-respected throughout our company and is the best choice to lead Midwest to future success the way Duke wanted.”

A member of the Small and Medium Market Radio committee with the NAB, Tanz received high praise from his co-workers.

“I am so proud of Peter as our new President,” Midwest Chief Sales Officer Jeff Wright — son of founder Duke Wright — said. “He clearly is the most qualified for this position, and the future of Duke Wright’s Midwest Communications is in confident hands. It goes to show you that you don’t need the ‘Wright’ last name to be part of the family as we have always considered Peter as one of the family.”

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Media Business

Eric Adams Launches Newsletter for New Yorkers to Bypass Media

Adams announced on Monday there would be a newsletter directly from his administration to New Yorkers, an endeavor to bypass the media and all their inquiries.

Eduardo Razo

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If you’re a New York City resident, then mayor Eric Adams is creating a program that allows news to reach citizens directly. 

Adams announced on Monday there would be a newsletter directly from his administration to New Yorkers, an endeavor to bypass the media and all their inquiries.

“You can report a distorted version of what I say. I want to speak directly to the people of this city and hear directly from the person they elected,” Adams announced (h/t Mediaite). 

“Columnists would give their opinions, reporters would just report the news. Now, I don’t know who’s the columnist and who’s the reporter. By the time I speak at a press conference and then I read the story, I say, ‘Were we at the same press conference?’”

Additionally, Adams stated that individuals can sign up for the “digital communications” program, which is practically a newsletter. The mayor, however, touted it as a way to directly convey the news to New Yorkers about initiatives.

“If we’re launching a new program that New Yorkers care about, that can put money in pockets or improve quality of life, I’m going to make sure New Yorkers hear about it directly,” he said.

Adams claimed New Yorkers don’t hear adequately about his achievements during his term as the city’s mayor.

“We’ve accomplished so much in our first year — from expanding the Earned Income Tax Credit to making quality child care affordable for all New Yorkers and more. But none of those accomplishments mean anything if New Yorkers don’t know about them and aren’t using them. That changes now,” he said.

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