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Cenk Uygur: Ben Shapiro ‘100 Percent Right’ in Feud With Steven Crowder

Uygur also shared a similar experience to relate to what The Daily Wire is going through.

Eduardo Razo

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The news media feud between Ben Shapiro’s The Daily Wire and Steven Crowder has many talking about the digital outlet’s proposed contract to the commentator. 

Additionally, the conversation isn’t only being had by those on one side of the aisle. “The Young Turks” host Cenk Uygur stated that Shapiro is in the right regarding his feud with Crowder. Uygur also shared a similar experience to relate to what The Daily Wire is going through.

“Obviously I can’t stand Daily Wire and disagree with the politics of @benshapiro completely, but they are 100 percent right in this dispute with @scrowder,” Uygur said on Twitter Friday. “Crowder planned to use their friendship to ambush them. This is exactly what Dave Rubin and Jimmy Dore did to us. Brazenly immoral.”

Uygur’s comments come on the heels of Candace Owens’ remarks, who defended The Daily Wire after Crowder accused the company of offering “immoral terms that actually punish conservative content creators on behalf of Big tech.” 

“It’s shocking that people cannot see the amount of acting that is going into this,” Owens said. “We all understand he’s a childhood actor, at the end of the day, he’s an actor. That’s also why he’s so entertaining when it comes to politics, he’s a talented person. But that people cannot discern the amount of acting that is going on, is stunning to me.” 

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Amy Robach, T.J. Holmes Negotiating Exits From GMA3

ABC News has reportedly been negotiating with the anchors this week about an amicable exit, with talks advancing “to the final stages”.

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According to a report from CNN’s Oliver Darcy, Amy Robach and T.J. Holmes are negotiating their exits from GMA3.

The anchors of Good Morning America’s third hour have been embroiled in a monthslong controversy after a reported romantic relationship between the anchors was revealed. The pair — who are each separately married — have remained off the air since the relationship was uncovered by The Daily Mail.

ABC News has reportedly been negotiating with the anchors this week about an amicable exit, with talks advancing “to the final stages”.

One source told Darcy that blame lies at the feet of both the anchors and ABC.

“There is a lot of frustration on all sides that it could have been handled better,” the source claimed.

A December report from The Confider claimed that ABC News staffers had grown tired of the coverage and the actions of the anchors, with one source saying “It’s an f—ed-up situation and there’s probably going to have to be some sacrificial lambs.”

After Robach and Holmes were temporarily removed from their positions, GMA3 saw a slight decrease in viewership.

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Cenk Uygur: Forcing DirecTV to Carry Newsmax Isn’t Capitalism

Cenk Uygur outlined why forcing a company like DirecTV to carry Newsmax doesn’t align with the United States’ capitalist views.

Eduardo Razo

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Newsmax is no longer available for DirecTV subscribers and while the CEO Chris Ruddy believes that the company’s goal was to censor the network, “The Young Turk’s” Cenk Uygur doesn’t think that’s the case.

Uygur put together a thread on Thursday where he outlined why forcing a company like DirecTV to carry Newsmax doesn’t align with the United States’ capitalist views. 

“I don’t know how much Newsmax asked for, but ten cents per subscriber is in the ballpark of a channel of that size,” Uygur tweeted. “That would mean they were asking for $66 million a year. Now conservatives are saying @DIRECTV should be made to pay that ransom because of political correctness.

“… When the government forces one company to pay another company because they like the politics of the second company is that socialism or communism?”

Uygur corrected the math on the second tweet as he roughly estimated how much Newsmax wants to reach an agreement with DirecTV. 

“Number of households I used for this calculation is wrong,” Uygur tweeted. “@DIRECTV is in 13.5 million households, so in this hypothetical the right-wing is demanding that they give just a $16.2 million to Newsmax. Forcing a company to pay someone else $16M is still not anywhere near capitalism.”

On Wednesday, Newsmax CEO Chris Ruddy appeared on The Howie Carr Show to discuss the situation and claimed DirecTV got exactly what it wanted.

“This is a blow. Their de-platforming of us was more than symbolic. It was vicious,” Ruddy said. “We’ve been on AT&T DirecTV for over five years, never had a real problem. We were up for renewal on our cable agreements — and like a lot of start-up channels — we weren’t paid a license fee.”

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CNBC Reshuffles Lineup, Brian Sullivan Takes Over Shepard Smith’s 7 pm Hour

CNBC president KC Sullivan announced several programming and anchor changes to the network, including naming the replacement for Shepard Smith’s 7 pm Hour.

Eduardo Razo

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CNBC president KC Sullivan announced several programming and anchor changes to the network (h/t TV Newser).

Sara Eisen moves from Closing Bell to co-anchor the 10 am. ET hour of Squawk on the Street, joining Carl Quintanilla and David Faber. As part of Eisen’s arrival, Squawk on the Street will be extended to a second hour, 11 am-12 pm. 

The second hour will replace TechCheck, and be co-anchored by Quintanilla and Eisen from the New York Stock Exchange, where the pair will continue to bring the analysis of the markets and economy.

Morgan Brennan will shift from Squawk on the Street to Closing Bell: Overtime, co-anchoring the broadcast with Jon Fortt from Englewood Cliffs HQ. Senior markets commentator Michael Santoli will provide daily analysis into Closing Bell: Overtime from the New York Stock Exchange. 

Fortt recently co-hosted TechCheck, which will take on a different form — a franchise with several daily segments across Business Day anchored by Deirdre Bosa from the San Francisco bureau.

Scott Wapner transitions as host of Closing Bell: Overtime (4 pm) to Closing Bell at 3 pm and continues to host Halftime Report at Noon ET. Halftime Report will now broadcast live from the New York Stock Exchange. Furthermore, Frank Holland will anchor Worldwide Exchange.

Nonetheless, the most notable announcement concerns CNBC’s 7 pm hour, which has been vacant since the network decided to cancel The News with Shepard Smith back in November. The business news channel is filling that hour with a new show named Last Call, anchored by Brian Sullivan.

“Last Call is a fast-paced, entertaining business show that explores the intersection of money, culture and policy,” Sullivan, the network president, wrote in a staff memo. 

“Through panels, debates and newsmakers, Last Call will not only deliver fresh takes on the biggest business topics of the day, but also shine a light on the other important stories that our viewers may have missed, all with an eye on what’s going to matter to the markets the next day.”

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